Evictions

Types of notices

There are 3 types of notices a landlord can give to a tenant, depending on the situation.

What’s important to know

All notices must:

  • be in writing
  • be signed by the landlord or the landlord’s agent
  • set out the rent that is due and any additional rent that may become due during the notice period
  • state the reasons for the eviction
  • state the time the tenancy ends

All notices for unpaid rent must also include:

  • a statement indicating that the tenancy will not be terminated if the tenant pays the rent due—and any overdue rent payments—on or before the termination date specified

A 48-hour notice to unauthorized occupants doesn’t have to include the reason for the eviction.

48-hour and 24-hour notices must also state the time the tenancy ends.

There are 3 types of notices, and each one is used in a specific situation:

  1. At least 24-hour notice
    • used in the event of significant damage to the premises or physical assault or threat to physically assault the landlord or another tenant 
  2. At least 48-hour notice
    • used in the event of an unauthorized tenant
  3. At least 14-days’ notice
    • used in the event of a substantial breach

Substantial breach

If either the tenant or landlord doesn’t fulfil the responsibilities in the residential tenancy agreement or under the Residential Tenancies Act, they may have committed a substantial breach.

By tenant

A substantial breach by a tenant may result in an eviction, and includes if the tenant

  • hasn’t paid rent in full when due
  • interferes with the landlord or landlord’s employees
  • disturbs other tenants (e.g. by playing loud music late at night or being noisy)
  • endangers others in the building
  • causes significant damage to the residential premises
  • doesn’t maintain or keep clean the residential premises and all property included in the residential tenancy agreement
  • doesn’t vacate the premises when the tenancy ends

If a tenant commits a substantial breach, the landlord can apply to the Residential Tenancy Dispute Resolution Service (RTDRS) or Court to end the tenancy, or give the tenant at least 14-days’ notice to end the tenancy.

A tenant must be given the notice at least 14 clear days before the tenancy is to end. This means the day the notice is given and the day the tenancy ends don’t count as part of the 14 days.

By landlord

Whether the tenancy is fixed term or periodic, a landlord may commit a substantial breach when:

  • the premises aren’t kept in a condition that meets minimum housing standards under the Public Health Act and regulations and
  • an executive officer issues an order under section 62 of the Public Health Act and the landlord hasn’t complied

Tenants can give at least 14-days’ notice to end a tenancy if they believe that the landlord has committed a substantial breach.
The notice is void if the landlord objects in writing within 7 days of receiving the tenant’s notice, as long as the order has been complied with or stayed.

Health inspection orders in Alberta

Assault / threats

If a tenant assaults or threatens to assault a landlord or another tenant, or does significant damage to the residential rental premises, the landlord can:

  • apply to the Residential Tenancy Dispute Resolution Service (RTDRS) or Court to end the tenancy, or
  • give the tenant at least 24-hour notice to end the tenancy

The landlord may pursue the tenant through the RTDRS or Court for any damages not covered by the security deposit.

If the tenant doesn’t leave

If a tenant has been given a 24-hour notice but does not move out, the landlord has 10 days after the tenancy ends to apply to the RTDRS or Court for an order that confirms the tenancy will end.

If the landlord doesn’t apply to court within 10 days, the notice is void and the tenancy hasn’t ended.

Unauthorized occupants

If tenant lives on the premises

If someone who is not listed in the tenancy agreement is living in the residential rental premises, the landlord has the right to give that person at least 14-days’ notice to leave.

If the person doesn’t move out within 14 days, the landlord can apply to the RTDRS or Court for an order for that person to vacate the rental remises.

If the tenant has moved out

If the tenant has moved out and an unauthorized occupant is living on the rental premises, the landlord can give them at least a 48-hour notice to leave.

If the occupant doesn’t move out within 48 hours, the landlord can apply to RTDRS or Court for an order for recovery of possession of the rental premises.

Contact this service

780-427-4088 (Edmonton)

1-877-427-4088 (toll-free)

8:15 am - 4:30 pm (Monday to Friday, closed statutory holidays)

Related services

Rental agreements

Ending an agreement

Residential Tenancy Dispute Resolution Service

Residential Tenancies Act and Regulations